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20100930
20100930
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CSPAN 3
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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
FOX News
Sep 30, 2010 3:00pm EDT
compared to "snakes." in washington, companies need to make more changes to protect us. box two: remembering the man who started in hollywood's big movies, the life and death of tony curtis. have scientists found another earth that could support human life? it's all new. it's all ahead. unless breaking news changes everything. but, first, from fox at 3:00 from new york, potentially dangerous weather blowing up the east coast. rain. and some wind. making a mess. this morning in new york city, it was monsoon-like rain. the midland issues has tornado watches and warnings. especially in virginia. across the border in north carolina, they took, look at flooding there. this is wilmington near the coast. and southeast corner of the state. and folks can expect this all over the place. our chief meteorologist is in the weather center. it looks like it moved west. >>reporter: most of the moisture is to the west of new york city and areas to the south. but you are seeing the pictures of wilmington with rainfall since sunday, over 20" in a matter of five days. that is causing big problems.
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2010 1:00pm EDT
permits. i'd now like to introduce our head table guests from your right. jeff, u.s. senate press gallery. jean from yahoo! news. lisa, "tribune newspaper's" "l.a. times." al, "the hill." andrew snyder, chairman of the speaker's committee, associate editor, kip linger washington editors. deborah, senior vice president, haguer sharp, and speaker's committee member who organized today's event. shawn, member of the press club board of governors. jonathan, bloomberg and former n.p.c. president. and a member from bergen records. [applause] today we are a little over a month away from elections that will likely bring changes in washington. poll after poll shows that voters are not happy. there's plenty of evidence that shows incurveents are unhappy. the economy is still struggling. the senate seems unable to move forward with major legislation as gridlock sets in final days before elections. it's not pretty. it's probably not a great time to be in charge of winning elections all over the country. or is it? our speakers today are two of the men who are in charge of leading their party's efforts
FOX News
Sep 30, 2010 6:00am EDT
made us look twice. tony curtis was born bernard schwartz on june 3, 1925, in new york. his relationship with his parents was less than smooth. his dad was an immigrant tailor who forced his son to work for him. curtis' neurotic mother was hard to deal with at times. his younger brother was killed in a road accident at the age of 9. a few years later, another brother was born who would eventually be diagnosed as schizophrenic. tony grew tired of his family life and at 17 he joined the u.s. navy. his navy stint brought him around the world though he never saw combat. toward the end of the 1940's, he returned home and quickly started acting classes. after a theater agent saw him in the greenwich village production of "golden boy" curtis was signed to a seven year contract with universal pictures. in 1949, curtis landed his first role in crisscross where he danced. two years later, he was given a leading role in "the prince who was a thief." that same year, curtis married actress janet leigh, a marriage that would last a decade. they had two daughters. one well known actress ja
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2010 7:00am EDT
so that's absolutely have to be done. it's called thank you for spending a few minutes with us -- host: thank you for spending a few minutes with us. now it is time for you to chime in. allow 30 days between your calls. you can also send us say tweet -- us a tweet. one editorial from "usa today" this morning. this is an ap article. that is in "usa today." this is their lead editorial this morning. "departing congress leaves piles of unfinished business." again, "usa today" editorial. and then "usa today" goes on to talk about issues like coal mining safety, food safety, etcetera. first call up. clarence in baltimore. caller: good morning. host: clarence, we're listening. caller: i would give congress say d--- congress a d-. they are not finishing. host: what would you like to see them do? caller: i would like them to pass the middle-class tax cut so it can continue. they will probably do it after the election. host: clyde in detroit. independent line. caller: i would give the republicans an f, democrats a d. i am a true independent. hi wish republicans and democrats stop callin
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2010 8:00pm EDT
of paperwork and record-keeping for small businesses, $48.72. the use of clear, easy-to-understand language in government paperwork will substantially reduce burdens on small businesses and save taxpayers millions of dollars. . millions of dollars. it will require federal government to use plain communications forms and public distributed documents, writing in a manner that follows the best practices of plain language writing. using these complex forms, letters imposes unnecessary hardships on american citizens and replacing them with plain language will improve service to the public, save time that agencies currently spend answering questions about what documents mean and make it easier to hold agencies accountable for their work. this will make it easier for americans and small businesses to work and understand their government. i thank my colleagues on both sides of the aisle who join me today for standing up for plain language and plain writing and standing up for effective communication with our constituents and standing up for small business owners and in standing up for the taxpayers
MSNBC
Sep 30, 2010 6:00am EDT
. >> young people have access to all technology. and they have the ability, unlike us, to use it. they know intuitively how to use these things. they don't have the ethics developed in life to understand -- obviously it's an extreme case of right and wrong. >> they can't figure out what strikes these kids as a prank ends up being something that costs a live. >> so ease sy to do. >> what is the nerve that hit everybody and us that made us say, that is the saddest thing? what is it here that is getting to us so much. >> i don't know. i think the kid -- >> the kid, kind of awkward, quiet sort of kid. >> played the violin. >> i also think he was struggling with his sexuality. it was a leap for him to do what he was doing in privacy and then to have it broadcast -- >> it's a type of bullying. >> which is so prevalent today. >> it went from zero to 200 miles an hour he was bullied and brought down by his own fears because they were plastered across the internet for everybody that he knows who is important to him to see. it's unbelievably cruel. >> probably including a lot of people who had no ide
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6